Artists

How To Destroy Angels Destroys The Status Quo

April 10, 2013
Fox Theater, Pomona

It was worth traversing multiple freeways and enduring the incessant glare of brake lights ahead of us throughout the long drive to Pomona. It’s worth going to Coachella, solely to see How To Destroy Angels. It’s well worth the price of tickets, at any cost.

Anybody who’s in any industry that revolves around connecting with, making an impression on, and moving people – artists, filmmakers, musicians, designers, executives in technology, advertising, gaming, sales, theme parks, theater – should be required to experience this show. Anyone who wants to experience being moved and touched in a way that will inspire them, spark passion and new ideas, should figure out a way to see HTDA.

We had considerable time to reflect and talk during the drive to Pomona. At one point, I began reminiscing about amazing shows I’ve seen in years past, which I’ve yet to write about. “Maybe I’ll start writing about all the outstanding concerts I used to see,” I said, noting that those shows are even fewer and farther between now.

I arrived at the Fox Theater, with no idea what to expect. I hadn’t watched the “teaser” video for the tour, seen the rehearsal photos, nor checked in on any social media site to see what the band or anyone else was saying pre-show. I’ve been to enough Nine Inch Nails shows to know that Trent Reznor – and everyone working with him – takes the experience of live music to new heights, every time he tours. “That’s what’s been missing from live music. . . ” I thought, remembering Reznor’s speech during the final Nine Inch Nails show in 2009.

From the flicker of the first light and the vibration of the first sound, How To Destroy Angels made an immense impact when they took the stage. It’s likely you haven’t experienced anything like this. The show was immersive, high-vibrational, other-worldly, and evolutionary. Eyes wide, considering the spectacular production surrounding me, I reached for my camera. By the time I got the camera out of its pouch I had missed 3 seconds of the show; those lost 3 seconds can’t be regained.

There’s no need to try to capture the show. You cannot do it. You cannot accurately capture How To Destroy Angels in a 2 nor 3 dimensional medium. The show encompasses at least 8 dimensions. Feelings, ideas, and music was delivered uniquely, with consistent intention and care. The experience expands your perspective, as new possibilities are constantly put in front of you. There’s no time between performances to recover from the state of awe felt during each song. When HTDA begin the next song, your eyes get wider, your smile gets larger, your vision and dreams expand — you cannot believe what you’re feeling.

Don’t worry about capturing How To Destroy Angels. Put away your devices. Experience the gift they’re sharing with you and all in attendance. I’d recommend you don’t watch the teaser video, don’t watch people’s shaky videos with blown-out audio on YouTube, don’t worry about how you’ll get to a How To Destroy Angels show – just make sure you get to one: http://tour.destroyangels.com/.

Two-thirds of the way through the show, I had tears in my eyes. They were tears of gratitude for the inspiration, the expansion, the art, the reminder to continually create at the highest level, with absolute integrity. HTDA provided an experience that moved me completely, on every level – visually, aurally, intellectually, and spiritually.

I remember the last time I saw Trent Reznor on stage – he made a vow to all of us, “I won’t let you down.” He is a man of his word. How To Destroy Angels is not some “fun side project”. Or maybe it is, but every second was created, delivered, and shared beyond the most artistic, creative, professional standards. Nothing was compromised. Everybody involved in creating this experience should be celebrated. There should be an awards ceremony where there’s only one award – and it goes to How To Destroy Angels. “This is our first show. Thank you for being here,” Mariqueen said, further highlighting all that I was feeling. HTDA is something profoundly unique. 

$27. The ticket was only $27. Thankfully, every now and then, Trent Reznor reincarnates to challenge our standards and our expectations. How To Destroy Angels isn’t giving their fans a run for their money, but they sure are giving everyone else one. 

Get tickets now: http://tour.destroyangels.com/  

 

Unreleased Video of Adele Surfaces

February 15, 2012

I just stumbled across this video of Adele, Pete Townshend, and Rachel Fuller from an episode of In The Attic, recorded in 2007. The In The Attic webcasts took place in an Airstream trailer and were broadcast live before The Who‘s concerts throughout their 2006/2007 European tour.

The 31-minute video includes interview as well as performance footage of Adele. This episode was recorded early on in Adele’s career, while she was still working on her debut album, 19. Throughout the show, Pete Townshend also shares some interesting stories about adventures and encounters he’s had on the road. Among the topics Adele discusses: Jack White and his. . . just grab your favorite beverage and watch the video:

The Dillinger Escape Plan: Get Ready To Lose Your Shit

November 1, 2011
The Wiltern, Los Angeles

Disclaimer: This Means Nothing to The Dillinger Escape Plan

The first time I saw The Dillinger Escape Plan play live was during Nine Inch Nails‘ set at Bonnaroo, June 2009.  If you’re going to share the stage with Nine Inch Nails, you need to know how to make people lose their shit.  That doesn’t mean jumping around maniacally and screaming, merely to put on a show.  While they do tear around the stage violently, The Dillinger Escape Plan knows that in order to make people “lose their shit,” you need to genuinely connect with them.  It doesn’t matter how much the band moves if they can’t move the crowd.

The next time I saw The Dillinger Escape Plan was during Nine Inch Nails’ final show, September 10, 2009, at The Wiltern.  Here’s the brilliance of The Dillinger Escape Plan: I remember them from those two shows and made it a priority to see them again.  I hadn’t experienced the band previously, I had no vested interest in them, I wasn’t a “fan”.  They more than held their own on stage with NIN.  The Dillinger Escape Plan added something to those shows.  Nine Inch Nails is arguably one of the best live bands ever.  It takes a lot to be additive to a Nine Inch Nails show, especially the final Nine Inch Nails shows.

2 years and hundreds of live show experiences later, I found myself at The Wiltern, once again seeing The Dillinger Escape Plan. This time, it was their set; they were playing their songs.  They didn’t have to win over potentially skeptical NIN fans.  They were playing to their fans and those of Mastodon, the band they were opening for.

The Dillinger Escape Plan gives you more than your money’s worth. You feel rewarded for buying the ticket, paying the exorbitant 60% service fees per ticket, standing in line, paying $5 for a 50-cent bottle of water.  Even if you don’t like their music, what The Dillinger Escape Plan does from start to finish is make people lose their shit.  There’s no ramp up to the show.  They come out full force and do not stop until they leave the stage.  Their entire set is performed at the energetic level of an encore.  At the end of the show, feeling like the band “paid” me, I bought a sweatshirt. That’s what you want – as an artist and a fan. The money, sure, but getting people to give a shit and therefore getting them to DO something – that’s the real pay off.

The Dillinger Escape Plan is raw.  Real. Authentic. In the moment. Rock climbing, skiing, mountain biking on the edge of cliffs – all things I’ve done – force you to be present.  When you’re truly experiencing life on the edge, anything other than what’s right in front of you disappears.  You are fully immersed in what’s happening, to the point where “beginning” and “end” dissipate. The only  remaining setting is “ON!”  That’s how The Dillinger Escape Plan plays.

Access to the pit at The Wiltern is generally GA, first-come, first-serve.  You exchange your ticket for a wristband and you’re in.  Once the pit hits capacity, you can stand on any one of several tiered levels (assuming you have a floor ticket).  The first tier crowd, above the pit, was going insane.  “How come you guys aren’t down here?” Greg Puciato asked them.  “Because of the tickets you have?? That’s ok, I’ll come to you.”

The Dillinger Escape Plan knows how to express their appreciation to their fans. Yes, it includes jumping over walls, walking on heads, and screaming in the faces of fans, but that’s what they came for.  And when the fans couldn’t get close enough, the band came to them.  “I would stay out there the whole time – I just can’t do it,” Puciato added as he jumped off the hands and shoulders of fans, over the wheelchair access ramp and wall dividing the pit, returning to the stage.  When you see the videos below, you’ll understand why it’s not sustainable to play the entire show, balancing on a ledge, crowd surfing, and head walking.

That said, if they weren’t climbing in  the crowd, they were scaling the amps or somehow levitating above it all.  As ticket sales across the board continue to decline, it’s bands like The Dillinger Escape Plan who will endure.  They know how to connect with their fans. They know how to make people lose their shit.

New tracks by Thom Yorke, Burial, and Four Tet

March 15, 2011

The song is called “Ego” and is the A-side of a limited edition (300 copies) 12″. Listen and let me know what you think:

Here is “Mirror”, the other side of the record.

(many thanks to “InkyBrown” for sending Mirror)

The Evolution of Radiohead “Lotus Flower”

February 20, 2011
My living room

The King of Limbs

Radiohead: The King of Limbs

All day today I was under the impression that it was Saturday.  A text message from a friend confirming our dinner plans tonight was my first indication that today was indeed Sunday.  Another friend reminded me that next weekend is the Academy Awards.  The sum total of what this means to me is that February is over already.

I feel like I’m in some parallel universe, where the relationship with time is much more dynamic, much less linear.   As I play around in this sphere, the question that often arises is “what happened?”  Not because I’m concerned, but because I like it here.

In the midst of this, my phone rang.  “How are you?” the familiar voice on the other end asked.  “I’m listening to Radiohead,” I replied.

And that’s the answer.  That’s what happened.

Radiohead’s latest album The King of Limbs came out Friday, following an announcement just a few days prior that the album would be available for download on Saturday.   I’m on Radiohead time.

I’m not going to write about the album because I like people to have the space to form their own opinions about music and because I don’t want to limit it with something as concrete as words.  Listen to it a few times.  Get lost in it. Or run away from it.  Whatever it moves you to do – move and do it.

Which leads us to the video for “Lotus Flower” that was released Friday morning (US time), just prior to the album becoming available.  The video racked up a substantial number of “plays” and accolades early in the day.  My first thought was, “wow… look how Lotus Flower has evolved.”

I was thinking back to October 2, 2009, the first time Lotus Flower was played live for an audience.   Thom debuted the song during a “secret show” to unveil his new band, “??????“.  ?????? soon became known as “The Thom Yorke band,” and by “known” I mean: people didn’t have the attention span to say “question mark question mark question mark question mark question mark question mark” and needed something more tangible.  On March 1, 2010, Thom Yorke declared ?????? had been named “Atoms For Peace.”  As time is dynamic, so is Thom Yorke, Radiohead, and the music they compose.  Even the older albums feel to me like they evolve upon each new listen.

I managed to capture quite a lot of video during that first show, in October 2009, much to the dismay of some self-declared “traditional journalists” who felt they’d been scooped “by some bloggers.”  That’s the challenge isn’t it? They’re behind.  We’re living in different times now, to the rhythm of instant gratification.  The real, immediate, news is reported on Twitter, the “Nightly News” is simply a recap of the history of that day.

So here’s the “Nightly News” video recap of “Lotus Flower” – the first single off The King of Limbs:

“Lotus Flower” performed for the first time, at The Echoplex, October 2, 2009:

[Video playlist] ?????? Live at The Echoplex

Official “Lotus Flower” Video, released February 18, 2011:

Radiohead “Lotus Flower”/Beyonce “Single Ladies” Thom Yorke dance mash-up:

“Lotus Flower Rick Roll”:

(“Lotus Flower live at The Echoplex” video courtesy http://www.youtube.com/user/starfiterpilot)

Free Download of Radiohead For Haiti Benefit Concert

January 24, 2010
Henry Fonda Theater Los Angeles

Radiohead for Haiti

Radiohead for Haiti

Web In Front has posted a podcast of Radiohead’s recent Haiti benefit concert.  You can either stream or download it here.

In the spirit of the event, Web In Front has also listed several places you can donate money to provide further relief to Haiti.   Radiohead’s benefit concert in Los Angeles on January 24th raised $572,754 for Oxfam’s Haiti Relief Fund.

Download the concert now

Set list, HD videos, and review of the show are posted here:  http://rockisagirlsbestfriend.com/2010/01/25/radiohead-for-haiti-at-the-henry-fonda/

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