Artists

Fever Ray, Trent Reznor, Henry Fonda, and Me

Henry Fonda Theater
October 7, 2009

The last time I was at the Henry Fonda Theater it was to see Nine Inch Nails’s second-to-last concert (theoretically) ever.  NIN absolutely destroyed the place! Not cosmetically, but existentially. It was one of the best shows I’ve ever experienced.  They took all my previously fond memories of past concerts at that venue, crumpled them up, and made them seem like insignificant moments in time. A reader posted the following comment on my review of the Nine Inch Nails show at Henry Fonda Theater:

September 11, 2009 at 6:37pm
They should just burn down the Fonda, because there will never be a better show there again.
If they leave it standing they should no longer be allowed to have any more concerts there.

b-ill-one

I’m not condoning arson, but I couldn’t have agreed more.  Something so outstanding took place that night that the Henry Fonda could have closed its doors forever and nobody would question it.

Fever Ray at Henry Fonda Theater

Fever Ray at Henry Fonda Theater

Well, it’s a good thing they stayed open because, tonight, Fever Ray resurrected the Fonda ghosts and turned that venue upside-down. . . again.  Does that make it right-side up now? If so, then the Henry Fonda is back in business.

I will admit that between opening acts I looked up at the stage and nostalgically felt that Nine Inch Nails show all over again.

But the instant Fever Ray hit the stage, all thoughts dissipated as the characters (aka the band) – led by Karin Elisabeth Dreijer Andersson (formerly, The Knife)  – transformed the Henry Fonda Theater once again. Fever Ray’s full, layered sound filled the room, complemented by the pulsing laser show.  There were costumes and face paint, and fans swayed in reverence.

I don’t believe a word was spoken on stage between songs and if so, I was too entranced to notice. You didn’t just hear the music, watch the lights, see the smoke – you felt the music, felt the lights, felt the smoke (some more than others).

This has been one of the most anticipated shows in LA since the tour was announced on May 12, 2009.  It may remain among the most talked-about until May 12, 2010. . . or whenever Fever Ray returns.

By the way, speaking of Nine Inch Nails, Trent Reznor was at the show  tonight, but nobody seemed  to care. Every now and then somebody returning from the bar or restroom would say, “Hey – Trent Reznor’s here!” And without turning their head, without shifting their eyes, the friend would respond, “yeah. . . ”

So this is what it’s like to go to a Fever Ray show:  your friend can tell you that your hero just walked in the room, and as if you were talking about the color of the carpet, you’d say, “yeah. . .  cool.”

That’s when you know you’re at a good show.

And here are some pictures:

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Thom Yorke at The Echoplex: “Kind Of A Rehearsal”

The Echoplex, Los Angeles
October 2, 2009

Tweet of the day: “Secured tix to the semi-secret Thom Yorke and friends show tonight. This is why I live in LA…they don’t do this shit in Kansas” (@brandonyano).

Thom Yorke and Flea

Thom Yorke and Flea

At 8:28pm Monday night, September 28, The Scenestar broke the news that Radiohead front man Thom Yorke had put together a new band and would be playing at The Orpheum in Los Angeles on October 4th and 5th.  Actually, let me rephrase – Yorke broke the news on Dead Airspace (although many of us heard about it first from The Scenestar), stating: “in the past couple of weeks I’ve been getting a band together for fun to play the Eraser stuff live and the new songs etc.. to see if it could work! At the beginning of October the 4th and 5th we are going to do a couple of shows at the Orpheum Theatre in Los Angeles. We don’t really have a name and the set will not be very long cuz ..well …we haven’t got that much material yet!”

Thom Yorke singing a new, untitled song

Thom Yorke singing a new song

Tickets for the October 4 and 5 shows went on sale Tuesday morning (September 29) at 10:00am and, as expected, sold out in minutes. Then, on Thursday morning (October 1), The LA Weekly posted a story surrounding a possible Thom Yorke and friends “secret show” at The Echoplex on Friday, October 2nd. Bloggers and fans speculated until Yorke posted another update on Dead Airspace late Thursday, confirming this additional, intimate show. Yorke’s post included a faulty link to purchase tickets, an announcement that tickets would go on sale at 8:15pm Thursday night, and the disclaimer, “I’ll believe it when I see it.”  That post has since been edited, because Yorke’s suspicions proved true and tickets did not go on sale at 8:15pm Thursday night.  (Yorke also included a working link to buy tickets in his revised post.)

Kind of a rehearsal

The band with no name

Instead, tickets were sold via TicketWeb at noon on Friday.  The gap between the initial announcement and the actual on-sale gave scalpers (who later attempted to sell tickets for as much as $3,500 on eBay)  enough time to ready their troops.  Unfortunately, it seems TicketWeb may not have had enough time to ready their servers.  Just minutes after the clock struck 12, there were hundreds of Tweets complaining of TicketWeb crashes and claiming “TicketWeb Fail”.  I know it’s frustrating, but to be fair, some major ticketing sites (including Ticketmaster and Live Nation) have been reported to crash during high-profile on-sales. Furthermore, in this case, we’re talking about one of the largest artists in the world, playing at a very small venue (approx. 700 capacity).  If the system did indeed crash, it should come as little to no surprise. As it happened, I was stuck in the “processing” queue for 12 minutes before the “sold out” message appeared.

Kind of a rehearsal

Kind of a rehearsal

For the lucky friends and fans of the band who got in, well. . . we were lucky.  Prior to the show I heard several audience members discussing the “little miracles” that allowed them to be there. Indeed, it felt miraculous to be introduced to new material and the formation of a new band led by Yorke, in such close proximity to the stage. This show was billed as a “warm-up,” as Yorke put it, “kind of a rehearsal.”

Well, I always imagined Yorke held himself to extraordinarily high standards, but if that show was a rehearsal, then a “rehearsal” has made its way into my top concerts of all time.

The band is comprised of exceptional musical talents: Thom Yorke (of course), Joey Waronker, Nigel Godrich, Flea , and Mauro Refosco.  To kick off the show, the as of yet unnamed band played Yorke’s solo album, Eraser, start to finish.  Yorke also debuted some brand new songs, solo, during one of two encores. He then invited the band back to join in on the remaining three songs.

Yorke gives the bird to requests for "Freebird"

Yorke gives the bird to requests for "Freebird"

If you were fortunate enough to find a place toward the front of the venue (under the high ceiling), you were treated to great sound, enjoyed watching Yorke lose himself in dance (although, you likely couldn’t miss that, regardless of where you stood), and watched closely as Yorke masterfully created and replicated the magnificent sound he’s known for.  The intimacy of the venue was further appreciated as Yorke joked, interacted with, and flipped off the audience.

Yorke didn’t flip off everyone, just the handful of people who were requesting “Freebird!” between songs.  Surprised people still do that?  Well, so was Yorke, “Shouldn’t you be calling out Stone Temple Pilots or something more current? Freebird is so 80′s!”

Thankfully, ignoring the audience (after showing them how he felt about the “Freebird” requests by giving them the bird), Yorke kicked in to more of his own songs.  “That sounded great!” yelled a fan, following the next song.

“Thank you,” Yorke replied with a smile, “it’s my job.”  Then, with another smile (bordering on a smirk), Yorke added, “sometimes I get paid for it.”

And therein lies another small miracle of this show, tickets were only $20 each. Thank you, Thom and the unnamed band.  Seeing as that was the rehearsal, I think you’re ready for the shows on Sunday and Monday.

Videos from the show:

New Song “Skirting On The Surface”:

New Song “Open The Floodgates”:

Next time, dance like you mean it, Thom ;)

Since it was a special show, here’s the set list (via At Ease).
01 The Eraser
02 Analyse
03 The Clock
04 Black Swan
05 Skip Divided
06 Atoms for Peace
07 And It Rained All Night
08 Harrowdown Hill
09 Cymbal Rush

Encore one [Thom solo]:

10 Open the Floodgates
11 Lotus Flower
12 Skirting on the Surface
13 Judge, Jury, Executioner

Encore two [full band]:

14 Paperbag Writer
15 The Hollow Earth
16 Feeling Pulled Apart by Horses

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I Have A Confession. . .

I’ve seen a few shows since and scattered in between the final Nine Inch Nails concerts.

The reason I haven’t written about these shows is that they pale in comparison to the NIN experiences of the past week.  The musicians I’ve seen are all very talented – exceptionally talented – and they deserve more than an uninspired review from me.

NIN Wave Goodbye at The Wiltern

NIN Wave Goodbye at The Wiltern

In some ways NIN has f*cked up music by being so good.  If you don’t think so, spend some time with their albums. The songs are layered, large, intense, spacious, melodic, unpredictable, calming, and frenetic. They are true compositions.  The stories and lyrics are timeless, allowing the meaning of the songs to evolve as we do.  That’s why songs written 20 years ago maintain the impact they would have if they were written today. Making music of this magnitude allows the band to launch innovative extensions of the songs – full-blown characters and story-lines, a potential TV series, DRM-free video files for infinite fan-created remixes. It also allows them to refrain from lyrics altogether and to release strictly instrumental compositions and projects such as Ghosts.

So, when I walked into a store this weekend and they were playing some diluted pop-hip-hop “song” I had to leave. I don’t know what song it was – I didn’t recognize it and I certainly wasn’t going to hang out in the store to find out.  I actually found the “music” insulting. It was manufactured, meaningless, and lacking soul. Summer camp songs have more depth than some of the stuff that’s currently on the radio.

Perhaps part of the reason people aren’t buying music the way they used to is because much of it just isn’t that good. It was crafted quickly and in a formulaic fashion to be a “radio hit”. It lacks depth and therefore timeless endurance.  Which means people are paying for songs that they may like for a couple months to a year, until they themselves outgrow it or it gets overplayed on the radio.  What makes it even harder to sell music like that is that some of the best bands of our time – Radiohead and Nine Inch Nails – give their music away for free.  Why pay for crap when you can get the good stuff for free? By the way, I think Radiohead and NIN are genius for doing this.

Last night the VMAs were on. I didn’t watch them.  I didn’t have to.  Every trending topic on Twitter was VMA-related. Friends, colleagues, and musicians were updating their Facebook status with commentary about the VMAs. And what I learned from reading enough sub-140 character descriptions of the show is that I didn’t miss a thing. The people who were ranting about the show for hours, they’re the ones who missed something. . .

Taking it a step further – hopefully you’ve seen Nine Inch Nails live. They’re now taking an indefinite break from touring and while it’s understandable and admirable, it still feels like a loss.  The band will continue to make music in some form together and as individuals with  other bands, but for the foreseeable future they will not be touring together.

Trent addressing somebody in the audience

Trent addressing somebody in the audience

I think what makes them so good is that they’re so real. While there may be light shows and spectacle, the authenticity of each moment is felt by the audience.  I’m not sure the crowd even feels like an “audience” – from my perspective, the audience is hugely participatory in creating the experience of Nine Inch Nails shows.  This is one example of a consistent energy exchange between musician on stage and fan in the crowd that is felt by all. The set list changes dramatically every night. New songs may be added, without the ideal rehearsal time, keeping the band on their toes so the performances don’t feel like performances.  It actually feels like the band is playing the songs and it’s the first time you’re seeing them live (even if you’ve seen them dozens of times).

Trent is also a perfectionist – more for the fans than for himself.  If a song isn’t going off right on stage, if there are technical difficulties, if he isn’t authentically feeling his performance in that moment, he’ll bag it. Additionally, NIN has a tendency to make even bad-sounding venues sound good. While the audio quality on some of the live videos I shot isn’t good (due to the technical limitations of the equipment I was using), in-person, at every show, Nine Inch Nails delivers impeccable sound. It’s one of the few concerts I’ve never had to wear earplugs to.  And that says a lot when you consider how loud and “noisy” some may consider their music to be.  But that goes back to the composition – it’s not really “noisy” – it’s layer upon layer of sound.  And Trent wants you to hear all of that, so they present it live with the perfect mix. . . every time.

Nine Inch Nails at Santa Barbara Bowl, NIN/JA Tour

Nine Inch Nails at Santa Barbara Bowl, NIN/JA Tour

They are so exceptional live that even seeing another “great band” just doesn’t hold up.  I remember seeing NIN at the Santa Barbara Bowl during this Summer’s NIN/JA tour.  The first thing that struck me about that show is that they were playing outside, during the daylight. What, no lights? So many people look forward to NIN’s light shows and seem to feel they’re integral to the whole experience.  And yet, when you see them without all that spectacle, you’re reminded of their sheer talent.  They don’t need lights or visual effects.  All they need to do is play.

Nine Inch Nails was “opening” (although, it was billed as “co-headlining”) for Jane’s Addiction.  Now, Jane’s Addiction is a really good band.  I’ve seen several great Jane’s concerts during the past decade. There are some amazing musicians in that band – Stephen Perkins and Dave Navarro are some of my favorites.  Perry Farrell is a wonderful performer.  He’s dynamic, energetic, dramatic – a true showman, an amazing front-man.  And yet, when Nine Inch Nails finished their opening set, I looked at my friends and said, “I love Jane’s Addiction, but we may need to leave.  I don’t know how they’re going to come anywhere close to that!”  In the end, we stayed throughout Jane’s set and we had a good time.  They were fun.  They sounded great. But Nine Inch Nails. . .

One show I did go see this past week was the closing show of the season at The Hollywood Bowl – Seu Jorge and Bebel Gilberto, with the LA Philharmonic.  That was nice. It’s outdoors, at one of my favorite venues, and it’s enough of a departure from what I usually see that there was no potential for comparison. I did briefly contemplate the idea of Trent playing Ghosts (perhaps all 4 current volumes, or the new ones that are due to come out) with the LA Philharmonic at some point. Then the fireworks began and brought me back to the present moment.

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Nine Inch Nails: Wave Goodbye (at The Wiltern, the final show)

The Wiltern Theater, LA
September 10, 2009

NIN's final show, Wiltern Theater

NIN

There’s not much to say. Last night marked the final performance for Nine Inch Nails for the foreseeable future and I was standing 5 feet from the stage.  It doesn’t get much better than that.  In fact, it might not get any better than that. Unless, of course, NIN says “just kidding” and start touring again next year.

The thing is – it didn’t seem to matter where you were standing for this show – everybody who was there was just happy to be there. I saw a post from a woman who was in the furthest seat back in the balcony and she sounds as moved and excited as me.

It hasn’t really hit me yet that this is the last time we’ll be seeing this band perform live, especially since I got used to seeing them almost every-other day during these final four shows. I even ran out of black t-shirts to wear. I’ll post some videos, pictures, and the setlist below, but let’s start at the beginning.

Enough said

Enough said

Any Nine Inch Nails show is an experience, but the experience of this show began with fans trying to get tickets during the original on-sale and people traveling in from around the world to be at what was actually supposed to be the second-to-last show ever.  As evidenced on the tour posters and shirts, the schedule changed last-minute when Trent became too sick to perform following the initial show at The Palladium. This meant the Henry Fonda (2nd) and Wiltern (3rd) shows had to be rescheduled.  The Echoplex show, which was originally billed as the final show, went on as scheduled last Sunday, making it the 2nd show instead of the last show.  Confused?  Imagine how the bosses, family members, spouses and friends of all the people who took time off work, traveled across the country (or from other countries), and camped outside days before each show felt! I met people who couldn’t tell their family they were in town from Chicago because they surely wouldn’t understand why they popped over to LA for a day to see Nine Inch Nails, but haven’t visited the family in a year. But in the end it all worked out.  Trent was well enough to perform the shows the way Nine Inch Nails is known and will be remembered for, and some fans who couldn’t previously get tickets were able to get into the rescheduled shows (although others who originally planned to be there had to return home to their jobs and families).

Speaking of family – Nine Inch Nails fans are  family in a way that I haven’t experienced with any other band.  There are definitely communities of fans that become friends through their shared love of a band.  And jam band fans in particular run into each other while following their favorite band around the country.  But Nine Inch Nails fans might as well be blood relatives. They look out for each other and NIN in a way that only a protective family member would.  And the band does the same for their fans. In a fairly successful attempt to eliminate the scalping of tickets for these shows, Nine Inch Nails controlled all ticket sales, limited 2 tickets per person, printed the buyer’s name on the tickets, required ID of the buyer for ticket pick up, both the buyer and the buyer’s guest had to be present to pick up the tickets and then a wristband was placed on both people for entrance into the show. When the band found out that somebody was purchasing large quantities of event shirts and selling them on eBay (causing shirts to sell out at the venue before the fans who were there could purchase one), they limited people to one t-shirt per customer. And although they announced their Summer tour would be their last, Nine Inch Nails realized the impact this would have on their fans and added these final intimate club dates as a proper send-off. And then they played their souls out.

A small section of the line that spanned for blocks

A small section of the line that spanned for blocks

Driving up to The Wiltern was quite a sight.  I passed by the venue Wednesday at midnight and there were already a good 15 – 20 people camping outside.  Dave Navarro also stopped by, brought water and snacks for the fans, and hung out for a bit.  Then, by 2:00pm Thursday, the line wrapped around the block so that you could look through the alley and  wave to the people waiting on the next street over.

The funniest thing to see were these huge straw patio umbrellas that several people seemed to have.  It was HOT outside and once people discovered that Ralph’s sold patio furniture, they cleaned them out.  Straw patio umbrellas were only $8 and they sold out in a flash. This was also one of the few places where the line for the men’s restroom was longer than the women’s. At one point, a guy drove by, blasting Lady GaGa.  If you drive by hundreds of Nine Inch Nails fans, with Lady GaGa as your soundtrack, you deserve the ridicule you receive. There was a fan who walked up and down the line, giving everybody candy.  “I’ve stood in this line 3 times (for the previous shows).  I know how it is,” she said.  Somebody asked me, “is there a show happening here?” I answered, “no” – you’ve got to be at least one step ahead of that for me to respond to you seriously.  Somebody asked a guy next to me “who’s playing?” and the guy, who had been answering that question since he arrived at 7:30am said, “Michael Jackson.”  Now, you might not think that’s funny.  But the person’s response was, “oh – cool!” and that’s either funny or scary. Then, there’s the “t-shirt douche” – the guy who bought NIN event shirts en mass and tried to sell them on eBay for more than $200 each. As soon as fans figured out who this guy was they took a picture of him and posted it online (along with some additional descriptive graphics added in Photoshop).  They shared it on Twitter and in the NIN forums and told everybody to be on the lookout for the “t-shirt douche.”  But what was even better than that is that people passed out fliers with the guy’s picture on it while everybody was waiting in line.  So now you have a line of several hundred people, holding these fliers that look like an R-rated version of an “America’s Most Wanted” poster and what happens?  The “douche” walks by, head down, as fans call him out and require him to leave.  Do not f*ck with Nine Inch Nails fans.

Once inside, there were the celebrity sightings: Tony Hawk, Ron Jeremy (for whom the crowd chanted and cheered), Rick Rubin, Tony Kanal (No Doubt), and Penn Jillette. But mostly there was the anticipation, excitement, and a bit of sadness that loomed in the air as everybody waited for Nine Inch Nails to take the stage for the last time.  The show was amazing.  All of these shows have been.  I’m actually afraid to see live music for a little while because it’s going to take a lot to move me after this.

Trent Reznor

Trent Reznor

There are Artists, Musicians, Singers, Composers, Performers, and Songwriters.  Some people are only one of those; Trent Reznor is all of them.  He writes some of the most beautifully composed music you’ll hear.  His music constricts and expands, extremely intense at times and then giving you space to breathe and expand with the notes. He has the ability to take all those sounds he hears in his head, and to articulate and translate them into something I can hear, process, and that moves my soul. His voice is exquisite – speaking and singing – I could listen to him for days. He’s honest and raw and 100% who he is – whether you (or he) like it or not – which makes his performances as real and authentic as they get. He’s given us 20 years of exceptional music and outstanding live performances. Even if you don’t like him, you gotta love him.

Numan and Reznor

Numan and Reznor

The set list was 3-4 pages in length and they played for over 3 hours.  Dave Navarro joined for a couple songs, as did The Dillinger Escape Plan, Mike Garson (Bowie), and Gary Numan. When they came out for the second encore Trent asked the crowd, “Are you guys tired?” Of course the crowd screamed “no!” and cheered. “No? Ok, I’m gonna test you.”

Although I don’t typically post set lists, I’m doing it for these shows because they’re the last shows and you can tell that a lot went into constructing a set in-line with such an event. So here it is:
1.    Home
2.    Somewhat Damaged
3.    The Collector
4.    Discipline
5.    March of the Pigs
6.    Something I Can Never Have
7.    The Frail
8.    The Wretched
9.    Ruiner
10.    Head Down
11.    Burn
12.    Just Like You Imagined (with Mike Garson)
13.    La Mer (with Mike Garson)
14.    Eraser (with Mike Garson)
15.    The Becoming (with Mike Garson)
16.    Down In The Park (Gary Numan cover) (with Gary Numan)
17.    Metal (Gary Numan cover) (with Gary Numan)
18.    I Die: You Die (Gary Numan cover) (with Gary Numan)
19.    1,000,000
20.    Letting You
21.    Survivalism
22.    Suck (Pigface cover)
23.    Down In It
24.    The Hand That Feeds
25.    Head Like a Hole

Encore:
26.    Me, I’m Not (with Atticus Ross)
27.    The Warning
28.    Piggy
29.    Gave Up
30.    Mr. Self Destruct
31.    Wish

Encore 2:
32.    Atmosphere (Joy Division cover)
33.    Dead Souls (Joy Division cover)
34.    The Good Soldier
35.    The Day The World Went Away
36.    Hurt
37.    In This Twilight

Here are some videos and photos from last night’s show, including Trent’s final speech to the audience.  But first, a thank you to Nine Inch Nails for the past 20 years, the music, the shows, the love, the heartbreak, and the friends met along the way.  Look forward to hearing what you guys do next.

Hurt

Something I Can Never Have

Piggy featuring Dave Navarro

Trent’s final speech to the audience

More Videos

"And it feels I'm getting to the end. . ."

"And it feels I'm getting to the end. . ."

One of the best bands in the world

One of the best bands in the world

Somewhat Damaged

Somewhat Damaged

"This thing is slowly taking me apart. . ."

"This thing is slowly taking me apart. . ."

"Something inside of me has opened up its eyes"

"Something inside of me has opened up its eyes"

surrounded by color

surrounded by color

Survivalism

Survivalism

Yes, he does smile. . .

Yes, he does smile. . .

Navarro joins NIN

Navarro joins NIN

"I won't let you down." Trent Reznor, September 10, 2009

"I won't let you down." Trent Reznor, September 10, 2009


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Nine Inch Nails – Wave Goodbye

and goodnight…

It’s 3:15am and I’m exhausted. It still hasn’t really hit me that this was NIN’s last show. I kind of got used to seeing them every-other day.

Videos are uploading. Feet are throbbing. A proper review, videos, and pics will be posted in the next day or 2. In the meantime:

Wave Goodbye

Wave Goodbye

20 years later. . . thank you

20 years later. . . thank you

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Nine Inch Nails – Henry Fonda Will Never Be The Same

and neither will LA. Nor live music.

Henry Fonda Theater
NIN Wave Goodbye Tour, night 3
September 8, 2009

You give me the reason. . .

You give me the reason. . .

“Wait – wasn’t Sunday’s show at the Echoplex supposed to be the last one??” For those of you who haven’t been following the events surrounding the final four Nine Inch Nails shows, there were some. . . complications.  After playing  a brilliant show (although he was sick) at The Palladium on September 2nd, Trent had to reschedule the NIN shows at Henry Fonda Theater (capacity: 1,300) and The Wiltern (capacity: 2,200) because he was too ill to perform.  Well, nobody’s complaining tonight!

I’ve been to A LOT of “best concerts ever”, but this may be the one that trumps them all.

Let’s start from the beginning:  Attending these final Nine Inch Nails shows makes me feel like the luckiest person alive.  It’s also like being on Survivor NIN.  Here’s how it goes:

  • Line-up to pick up your tickets.
  • Make alliances in line.
  • Line-up to enter venue.
  • Eat dinner in line.
  • Hydrate.  But not too much. You don’t want to have to leave during the show to go to the bathroom.  Nor do you want to fight your way back to your spot after doing so.
  • Make more alliances in this second line.
  • Conspire with other fans to find the guy who’s buying up all the tour shirts and selling them on eBay.
  • If anybody asks what happened to that guy, everybody uses the “I don’t know – I was standing in line with all these guys” alibi.
  • Get strip searched on the way into the venue. They told me they were “looking for weapons. . .  or jewelry”.
  • Try to figure out why they’re looking for jewelry.
  • Enter the venue and get in the merch line, hoping they don’t sell out of event shirts this time.
  • Look for the guy who’s been selling shirts on eBay. Somebody must have already taken care of him.
  • Grab a spot on the floor, surrounded by new friends and stand your ground for the next 5 hours
  • Get an amazing shoulder workout by holding the camera above your head for several hours

The only difference is – on Survivor you win a million dollars.  Tonight we won the best performance we could have hoped for from Nine Inch Nails.  Yes, I’d rather have that than the million dollars at this point.

NIN kicked off with “Head Like A Hole” and the crowd went nuts (I’ll post the video as soon as it’s done uploading).  From that point forward the energy just continued to rise. The walls at the Fonda were shaking.  From “Head Like A Hole” they went straight into “Terrible Lie” which is always a welcome song. Next, they played “Sin” which I had been not-so-secretly hoping to hear during these final shows.  It’s one of my favorite NIN songs and it’s been a little while since I’ve seen them perform it live.

Wish there was something real. Wish there was something true.

Wish there was something real. Wish there was something true.

Alright – I just took a brief time-out because I have A.D.D. and did a trend search on Twitter for #NIN. . .  Apparently I’m not the only one who feels this way.  Everybody is talking about how this was “the best show ever.” And thanks to them for reminding me to tell you that the show was 3 hours.  Solid. 2 encores. Guest appearances by Mike Garson (Bowie), Gary Numan (who needed no introduction this time), Eric Avery (Jane’s Addiction), Danny Lohner (NIN), Greg Puciato (Dillinger Escape Plan). They finally played “Atmosphere” (following a failed attempt due to technical difficulties at The Echoplex on Sunday).

I don’t ordinarily do this because there are plenty of places that post the setlist and there are so many other details that can be written about that illuminate the experience, but in this rare (and perhaps only) instance, here’s the setlist from tonight’s show:

Head like a hole

Head like a hole

1. “Head Like A Hole”
2. “Terrible Lie”
3. “Sin”
4. “March Of The Pigs”
5. “Piggy”
6. “Echoplex”
7. “Reptile”
8. “I’m Afraid Of Americans”
9. “Survivalism”
10. “Head Down”
11. “1,000,000″
12. “Letting You”
13. “Burn”
14. “Gave Up”
15. “Eraser”
16. “Just Like You Imagined” (Featuring Mike Garson)
17. “The Becoming” (Featuring Mike Garson)
18. “I Do Not Want This” (Featuring Mike Garson)
19. “Down In The Park” (Featuring Gary Numan)
20. “Metal” (Featuring Gary Numan)
21. “Cars” (Featuring Gary Numan and Eric Avery)
22. “Anthrax” (Gang of Four) (Featuring Gary Numan and Eric Avery)
23. “Heresy” (with Danny Lohner)
24. “Get Down Make Love” (Queen) (with Danny Lohner)
25. “Mr. Self Destruct” (Featuring Greg Puciato and Danny Lohner)
26. “Wish” (Featuring Greg Puciato and Danny Lohner)
27. “The Hand That Feeds”
28. “Atmosphere” (Joy Divison)
29. “Dead Souls” (Joy Division)
30. “The Day The World Went Away”
31. “Hurt”

The band sounded great.  Guitars and equipment were tossed in the air. Trent easily jumped 4 feet high and the crowd did the same.  With this performance Trent and the band seemed to be saying a few things:

  • “Sorry we had to postpone the original show.  But you see now, right? THIS is the show we wanted to give you and we couldn’t have done it while I was sick.”
  • “We really are leaving for a while.  But before we do – we’re going to remind you that we’re one of the best live bands you’ll ever see.”
  • “I’m sweating more than you.”
  • “Thank you!”

I could go on and on, but you’d get sick of hearing me tell you how phenomenal this night was.  So hear it from some other people – do a Twitter search for #NIN.  I’m not the only one.

Videos from Henry Fonda Theater, Wave Goodbye LA night 3:
(Recorded sound quality isn’t very good, but the visuals are awesome and video footage is good so I wanted to post it regardless. I have excellent sounding video recordings from the Palladium show here: http://rockisagirlsbestfriend.com/2009/09/03/nine-inch-nails-wave-goodbye-la-night-1/)

Head Like A Hole:
This is how they started the show. The entire show was an encore!

Sin:

Hurt:

Burn:
Check out the light show and the look in his eyes.

More videos from this show are posted here: NIN Live at Henry Fonda (videos)

Resting up for Thursday’s show. Wave Goodbye.

This is all a dream

This is all a dream

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