Tag Archives: concert

David Byrne and St. Vincent at The Greek

David Byrne and St VincentSomebody should have recorded the sound of the crowd following the first encore. I think that would best express what happened when David Byrne, St. Vincent, and their phenomenal brass band performed at The Greek Theatre Saturday night.

In fact, if that’s all you heard about the show – the sound of the audience as it concluded – that should be enough to get you to seek out a time and a place to catch this tour. David Byrne and St. Vincent took the notion of a “concert” and created something so unique it shouldn’t be classified. It was more like a spectacular dream than anything else you’d have experienced musically.

The evening unfolded, surprising and unique, every step of the way. It’d probably serve you best not to seek out the videos captured on cell phones, the set list, nor look at photos posted on Instagram. Even if you come away thinking you know what this show is about, you won’t know until you experience it. It’s so special that I’m only going to share bits and pieces.

Even if I wanted to, I don’t have more photos to share. I couldn’t be bothered to take more than 3 pictures. It was all I could do not to spill my wine, I was so mesmerized. Here’s what I can tell you:

  • From the moment the audience entered the amphitheater, they were part of the experience, before the “show” began.  This provided the opportunity to transition out of the day, beyond traffic, parking, the world at large, and into “the night” (as interpreted by David Byrne and St. Vincent).
  • The songs danced in harmony with the voices in my head. We’re not alone in this world, especially when you consider the beautiful absurdity of it all.
  • Outside of The Polyphonic Spree, I’ve not seen Annie Clark (“St. Vincent”) perform prior to this and I don’t know why the fuck not. It’s possibly the biggest mistake I’ve made.  She’s phenomenal.
  • The one woman in the audience who was encouraging people to sit down was sorely outnumbered. She eventually stood up.
  • This is a show that’s worth paying more for, in order to have seats closer to the stage. You can always watch the video monitors, but you’re going to want to see their feet.
  • Byrne and Clark don’t appear to perform music.  Music appears to perform them.  You can see every note winding its way through each of them.  The music takes form inside of them, before it’s articulated into sound externally.
  • There are certain tones in music that hit corresponding points in the body. You can feel the notes move through you and understand how they move through Byrne and Clark. It’s a two-way conversation, this David Byrne/St. Vincent show.
  • If you’ve been listening to their album, Love This Giant, this show’s arrangement will be an additional treat for you.
  • Here are the remaining tour dates and I’m told more will be announced, go: http://www.ilovestvincent.com/index.php/shows

 

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Metric at The Greek Theatre

Metric

Metric at The Greek Theatre

The guy behind me was jumping up and down before the show began. “I can’t help it! I’m just so excited!” he exclaimed. I looked at him, smiled, and screamed, “I’m excited too!”

Metric shows are always a lot of fun. The mere thought of their high energy performance is enough to fuel fans before the show begins and carry them all the way through to the next show. Their performance at The Greek Theatre in Los Angeles Tuesday night was no exception.

Shouts of “I love you Emily!” roared through the night sky between every song, the audience expressing their appreciation of the dynamic and captivating lead singer, Emily Haines. Typically the passionate cheers occurred as Haines was setting up for the next song. Without stopping, without breaking concentration, it was apparent Haines felt Emily Hainesthe love. A smile would start to appear on Haines’ face and then she and the band would launch into yet another crowd favorite – the musical equivalent of “I love you too”.

Rather than make the audience wait, wonder, and hope they’ll play it, Metric played “Help I’m Alive” fairly early in the set. It was a kind of gift, as if to say, “Now you can relax and enjoy the remainder of the show, without wondering if or when we’ll play that song.” Playing the encore-worthy hit early in their set was also quite a testament to Metric. The songs that preceded “Help I’m Alive” and the songs that followed punctuated the fact that Metric is no one-hit-wonder. Every song in their set is equally strong and infectious.

Metric’s concert at the 5,900-capacity Greek Theatre signifies quite a journey from the nights they used to play Club Spaceland (capacity: 260). During one of several moments in which she expressed gratitude to all in attendance, Haines reflected on those early days in Los Angeles. “As I sing these songs it brings me back to that time. I remember eating expired Power Bars from the 99 Cent store,” she said with laughter.

Metric

“I guess – when you look back on your life story – you want your life to be a collection of really great jokes” – Emily Haines

As I listened to Haines speak and reflected on their lyrics, I realized what I like most about Metric is that they celebrate all aspects of life, even the things others would classify as “fucked up”. It’s what makes us who we are – the good things and the challenges. The celebration is that we’re here to experience it all, together.

“I guess – when you look back on your life story – you want your life to be a collection of really great jokes. ” Haines continued.

As Metric played “Clone”, the crowd sang along, making the song their own personal anthem. “Nothing I’ve ever done right happened on the safe side. . .” the voices of the audience joined Haines proudly.  Then, in celebration of it all, “My regret only makes me stronger yet!”

MetricListening to Metric, experiencing their live shows, embarking on the journey from clubs to amphitheaters with them, it’s easy to understand why the audience adopts their songs as personal anthems.  Truth and acceptance. The truth is ok. Embrace it. Accept and celebrate who you are.

The light display along the back of  the stage transformed into a countdown clock prior to the encore. Again, a kind of gift, alerting the crowd that the band would of course return, no need to worry.  Rather than expend a lot of energy, creating thunderous applause and ear-piercing cheers to woo the band back to the stage, the audience gained energy in anticipation of the band’s return. As the moment neared, the audience roared, “Ten. . . nine. . . eight. . . seven. . . six. . . five. . . four. . . three. . . two. . . one!” and Metric took the stage again.

“It’s rock and roll, for fuck sake. I’m glad we survived. I’m glad you’re here with us. This is something we built together, at this point,” Haines said, once again thanking, and metaphorically sharing the stage with, the audience. The passionate anthem sing-a-longs continued until Metric left the stage and the house lights came on.

In addition to being a great band, Metric is an example of hard work and perseverance  paying off. Even as they celebrate their successes now, they continue to work hard. I saw them play, back in the day, at Spaceland – Metric has been giving it everything they’ve got, every step of the way.

Catch them on tour if you’re able: http://ilovemetric.com/tour/

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Damien Rice at Hotel Cafe

Damien RiceDuring the rare occasions when I consider the possibility of leaving Los Angeles, I remember experiences like Damien Rice playing at The Hotel Cafe Sunday night.  It’s a “once in a lifetime” opportunity which thankfully has happened more than once in this lifetime.

L.A. –  where you can wake up on a Sunday morning, ease into your day somewhat aimlessly, and find out that one of your favorite musicians – somebody who typically sells out much larger rooms – is playing a last-minute show, that same night, at one of your favorite and most intimate venues.

On Sunday morning, October 7th, it was announced that Damien Rice would be playing as part of Nic Harcourt‘s 88.5 KCSN Presents show at The Hotel Cafe later that night. It was the first in what is to become a monthly series hosted by Harcourt at The Hotel Cafe. It was also the first time Rice has played in Los Angeles since 2007.

Damien RiceThe show sold-out in a matter of minutes.  People who didn’t have tickets lined up 6-7 hours early in hopes additional tickets would be released at the door. People who did have tickets lined up 6-7 hours early with the goal of obtaining a prime position, close to the stage, for the standing room only event.

The evening’s openers, Kita Klane and The Lonely Wild, had an exceptionally rewarding and equally challenging job before them: opening for Damien Rice. Harcourt kicked off the evening, introducing the radio station (one of my favorites) and his new, curated, monthly concert series. He expressed his enthusiasm that Rice agreed to join the line-up, while sharing his concurrent enthusiasm about introducing the audience to two newer bands he’s passionate about. Harcourt did an amazing job of setting the tone for the evening and the audience was attentive, receptive, and engaged, during both opening performances.

The crowd’s attention to Kita Klane and The Lonely Wild is quite a testament to each band.  What was once going to be an important, yet more low-key evening, was suddenly an even higher-profile show, playing to what could have been – and in many cases would have been – a difficult audience. Kita Klane and The Lonely Wild stepped up to the challenge in a way that inferred “we’re this good all the time, not just tonight.”

Damien RiceThe spectacular evening was also a testament to the crowd.  Rice’s fans appreciate music. They listen. They dance, laugh, clap, and cheer, when appropriate. They trust the venue and the evening’s curator to present shows that will be of the highest quality.  Their expectations are high, as is their confidence that expectations will be met.

Rice began with “Delicate” and concluded with “Volcano”, complete with a crowd sing-along, in the round.  Everything in between was as exceptional. Rice’s voice is impeccable, his songs honest.

Rice guided the audience through his set, describing the various stages of his failed relationships, the resulting introspection, and the songs that emerged in the end. He sang with eyes closed most of the time, but opened them each time he belted, “I remember it well. . . ”

Damien RiceHis honesty and humor shared the stage with his music.  Introducing “The Professor & La Fille Danse,” Rice asked the crowd to imagine if, when they were younger, someone gave them a million dollars every day, along with the advice, “do good with it.”  Then, the next day they show up to give you another million dollars, and so on, for the rest of your life.  ”Well, we are given a million sperm each day,” he said, adding that this is the root of failed relationships. Later, endearingly labeling himself an “asshole,” Rice debuted a new song, “Greatest Bastard”.

What happens when Rice sings – and consider this your warning – is he unsuspectingly draws you in with his exquisite voice. Then, you’re enveloped in the story and you begin to feel what he’s experiencing. The pain is mitigated by his voice, his sense of humor about it all, and the drink in your hand. As Rice sings, and the songs build, you realize you’re fucked.  Welcome to Damien’s world.

His relationships may fail, but his shows are always a success.

Damien Rice

Damien Rice

Damien Rice

Damien Rice

Damien Rice

Damien Rice

Damien Rice

Damien Rice

Damien Rice

 

Damien Rice

 

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A Show For Mayla – Daniel Lanois, Father John Misty, Becky Stark, Great Northern

Last night a group of wonderful musicians came together in support of an amazing family.

A Show For Mayla” took place at LA’s Bootleg Theater and featured performances by Great Northern, Becky Stark, Daniel Lanois, and Father John Misty.  The show was created to raise funds in support of 3 year-old Mayla Embry, daughter of well-known local songwriter and producer Aaron Embry, who has been diagnosed with Leukemia.

Great Northern kicked off the evening with songs and a performance that sucked you in like a good novel. It almost felt like a trick; a welcome trick.  The songs went places I didn’t expect them to go, not because they were new to me, but because they actually had an arc, momentum, story, and fervor to them that (I feel) is becoming a lost art in both mainstream and indie music.

Becky Stark took the stage next and cooed songs about love. Optimism and naivety were in a constant dance.  On the surface, rose-colored glasses. Yet Stark allows you to peer through the window, and deep into the uncertainty that sparks a once silent prayer into a song.

Next up was one of my favorites, Daniel Lanois. Among the things I love and respect about Lanois:

  • He’s a kind, wonderful person
  • He’s a brilliant musician
  • He has produced some of my favorite albums
  • His instrumental songs express more than many songs that have lyrics
  • He is a reminder to make sure we let people know how much we appreciate them, every time we have the opportunity

Lanois sounded amazing. His shows are always a treat. They will spoil you, as you constantly feel you’re being rewarded, just for being there, just for being alive. If you don’t think you’ll remember to check his website for shows in your area, set up a Google alert.  If you’ve seen Lanois before, see him again. And again. And again.

Father John Misty’s entertaining set concluded the night. This was my first time experiencing Josh Tillman’s solo endeavor, though I’ve surely heard the buzz.  At this point, buzz makes me skeptical so I’ve been cautiously and intentionally avoiding Father John Misty.  Last night’s performance was a buzz killer – in a good way.

Tillman’s voice, his expressiveness, the content of his songs and the improvisational way that he delivers them is refreshing.  Tillman is an artist who’s adept at integrating the current environment into his show, giving me confidence that although I’ve only seen him once, every show is unique.  The audience’s enthusiasm often sparked banter, mid-song, that Tillman artfully wove into his performance, so that it was additive rather than distracting.

Tillman’s quick wit is as admirable as it is entertaining. It requires full presence and awareness in each moment, while he is simultaneously lost in song.  I look forward to seeing him again.

For more information or to contribute to the Mayla Embry Benefit Donation Fund, please visit: http://weareeachother.com/2012/10/01/mayla-embry-benefit-donation-fund/

Daniel Lanois:

Daniel Lanois

 

Daniel Lanois

Daniel Lanois

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Father John Misty:

Father John Misty

Father John Misty

Father John Misty

Father John Misty

Father John Misty

Father John Misty

Father John Misty

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Dave Stewart and Friends at The Troubadour

If you were in L.A. tonight and you weren’t at this show, consider seeking professional attention.

Dave Stewart and friends, Orianthi, Colbie Caillat, Delta Goodrem, John Mayer, and Dave’s 12-year old daughter, Kaya, played a show that was whole-heartedly in the spirit of rock & roll.

Thomas Lindsey kicked off the night with tremendous courage, backed by his exceptional talent.  The  crowd at The Troubadour was living Friday night like they earned it – cocktails flowing, conversations buzzing – the room was charged. . . and loud.  With no introduction, Thomas Lindsey took the stage, looked around, and began to sing.  No instruments. No band. It took Lindsey precisely 17 seconds to silence and command the attention of everyone in the room.

Given Stewart’s talent and true genius, his shows are something that need to be experienced first-hand.  He takes music, rock & roll, community, collaboration, and style to new heights.  If you pay attention to the subtleties, you’ll also discover his quick and poignant sense of humor.   Something about Stewart – everything about Stewart – will make you feel more alive, infinite, and connected. He reminds you that rock & roll is meant to be fun, celebratory, and invigorating.

As is the case with Stewart, Stewart’s 12-year old daughter, Kaya, is a talent you need to see for yourself. She will blow you away, period.  Kaya raises the bar.  The music business should be afraid.

Stewart was joined on stage by a great group of exceptionally talented friends. Among my favorites – and I’ve seen her before – is Orianthi. If you don’t know who she is, look her up. If you haven’t seen her perform, prioritize it on your to-do list. She’ll simultaneously kick your ass and melt your heart, simply in the way she plays. Then, after a couple hours of giving everything she has to live music, she comes off stage and  gives everything she has to fans, signing autographs, posing for pictures, and having in-depth, meaningful conversations. If you didn’t know better, you’d think everyone Orianthi met in the crowd for the first time was actually a long-time, dear friend.  Again, she’ll kick your ass and melt your heart.

You had to be there. I was there and came home so amped up I couldn’t sleep.  Time for coffee.

Here are some pictures:

Thomas Lindsey silenced the entire room, using nothing other than his voice

Dave Stewart

Dave Stewart Orianthi

Dave Stewart Orianthi

Dave Stewart and Kaya

Dave and 12-year old daughter, Kaya

Dave Stewart and Kaya

Dave Stewart and Kaya

Dave Stewart Orianthi

Orianthi

Orianthi

Orianthi

Dave Stewart Orianthi

Dave Stewart Orianthi

Dave Stewart

Dave Orianthi

Colbie Caillat and Dave Stewart

Colbie Caillat

Colbie Caillat and Dave Stewart

Delta Goodrem

Delta Goodrem

Delta Goodrem

Delta Goodrem

Dave Stewart Orianthi

Dave Stewart and friends

Dave Stewart and friends

Dave Stewart and Orianthi

John Mayer

John Mayer

John Mayer

John Mayer and Dave Stewart

John Mayer

Orianthi

Orianthi Dave

John Mayer Dave Stewart Orianthi

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