Tag Archives: music

RNDM at The Troubadour

Joseph Arthur,  Jeff Ament, and Richard Stuverud are RNDM.

RNDM

RNDM

RNDM

RNDM

RNDM

RNDM: Joseph Arthur, Richard Stuverud, Jeff Ament

Richard Stuverud

Richard Stuverud on Drums

Joseph Arthur and Jeff Ament

Joseph Arthur and Jeff Ament

Joseph Arthur and Richard Stuverud

Joseph Arthur using Richard Stuverud’s broken drumstick on guitar

Richard Stuverud

Richard Stuverud

Jeff Ament

Jeff Ament

RNDM

RNDM

Joseph Arthur

Joseph Arthur

Jeff Ament

Jeff Ament

Richard Stuverud

Richard Stuverud

Joseph Arthur

Joseph Arthur

Richard Stuverud

Richard Stuverud

RNDM

RNDM

Setlist

The remains

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Watkins Family Hour at Largo Los Angeles

watkins family hourWatkins Family Hour is the perfect show leading up to the holidays. With Thanksgiving rapidly approaching, Sean and Sara Watkins’ sheer talent, along with a healthy dose of murder ballads are welcome reminders of how blessed we are to be alive.

Once a month, for a decade now, The Watkins have been bringing their guitars, fiddles, and friends to Largo for what has long been one of my favorite shows in LA.

They often share the stage with some other people you may recognize, including Fiona Apple, Dawes, Jackson Browne, Van Dyke Parks, and John C Reilly. Yet, Sean and Sara are the foundation of the show and even if no on else were to join them on stage, they’d still have one of the best shows in town.

To play the way these siblings do requires that they actually listen to each other, constantly. It’s as if the universe has simultaneously presented them with a brilliant gift and ever-present joke – you’ll make great music together, but you have to get along. Perhaps that’s why the only detectable sibling rivalry seems to stem from their sense of humor. The murder ballads are balanced by Sean and Sara one-upping each other with witty observations. Their snarky sense of humor showdowns are a testament to how much they respect each other, as family, as musicians, as friends. Eventually, one of them acquiesces, “Ok, that was good!” and they jump into the next song.

The Watkins Family band is unparalleled: Benmont Tench on piano, Sebastian Steinberg on bass, Don Heffington on drums, and Greg Leisz on steel pedal guitar.  It’s worth attending this show monthly, for the musicianship and camaraderie alone.  Throw in a lot of laughs, some special guests, frequent surprises (dancing bears and such), and the perfect venue, The Watkins Family Hour is an exceptionally worthwhile way to spend an evening.

Last night’s show was no exception. Although I attend The Watkins Family Hour monthly, I’m always moved – as if I’m experiencing it for the first time – by how uplifting The Watkins’ shows are.  The shows vary significantly from month to month, but some things are consistent: beautiful voices, blended with remarkable musicianship and laughter.

The next Watkins Family Hour takes place on December 19th at Largo. Sadly, it’s the one show this year I have to miss.  Luckily for you, that means there will be a couple extra tickets available.  I highly recommend you get tickets in advance and round out 2012 with what is sure to be an amazing and memorable evening.

For those of you not in LA – and those of you in LA who would like to re-live some of the shows – there are 7 free podcasts of The Watkins Family Hour at iTunes. Episode 7, recorded on an iPhone due to a power outage, is the show I wrote about here. It remains among my favorite lifetime experiences to date.

Thank you for another wonderful year, Watkins Family.  I’m still campaigning to have a “Season Tickets” package available for purchase.

 

 

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Black Box Revelation at The Troubadour

October 17, 2012

Black Box RevelationLate last year I saw Black Box Revelation open a show at The Wiltern. I had to reference Google to remember what show it was, but I had no problem remembering Black Box Revelation.

What struck me about their show at The Wiltern was its authenticity.  It didn’t feel like it was about money or fame, a “hit” nor a label.  With Jan Paternoster and Dries Van Dijck (Black Box Revelation) it was simply: music.  After that initial show, I vowed to see them the next time they came to L.A.

October 17th was a particularly busy night in Los Angeles, musically speaking. There were, at minimum, five competing shows I would have liked to see.  Depending on the set times and the distance between venues – if you’re not drinking – it is possible to see 2-3 shows in one night in Los Angeles.  I’ve done it before, but on this particular Wednesday night I was drinking and I was determined to see one band: Black Box Revelation, at The Troubadour.

Black Box RevelationWhen Paternoster and Van Dijck started playing, I forgot about all the other places I had considered going, the other bands I might have seen.  There was a reason I vowed to see Black Box Revelation the next time they played in L.A. and I was rewarded for sticking to the plan.

Perhaps it’s because they hail from Brussels where, I imagine, if you’re playing music, it’s truly for the sake of playing music. It could be the lack of props and a light show that keeps the focus on the music. Or, maybe it’s the way some people compare them to The Black Keys and The White Stripes, which makes sense in that they play rock music and it feels familiar. Yet, Black Box Revelation is different. Perhaps the familiar feeling is the comfort that comes with consistency in quality.

During the course of two shows, I’ve identified numerous things I find appealing about Black Box Revelation, yet they still maintain a sense of mystery.  Not only do they play rock & roll music, they are rock & roll, to the core.  Their music is your invitation into their world. The rest is up to you. Don’t expect this band to put out a lyrics video. They won’t stop the show to explain the meaning of the next song they’re going to play.  They don’t hard-sell you to visit the merch table. Black Box Revelation doesn’t insult your intelligence.  They trust you’ll get it.

Before the music business there was music. Black Box Revelation is keeping that era alive.

Black Box Revelation

Black Box Revelation

Black Box Revelation

Black Box Revelation

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David Byrne and St. Vincent at The Greek

David Byrne and St VincentSomebody should have recorded the sound of the crowd following the first encore. I think that would best express what happened when David Byrne, St. Vincent, and their phenomenal brass band performed at The Greek Theatre Saturday night.

In fact, if that’s all you heard about the show – the sound of the audience as it concluded – that should be enough to get you to seek out a time and a place to catch this tour. David Byrne and St. Vincent took the notion of a “concert” and created something so unique it shouldn’t be classified. It was more like a spectacular dream than anything else you’d have experienced musically.

The evening unfolded, surprising and unique, every step of the way. It’d probably serve you best not to seek out the videos captured on cell phones, the set list, nor look at photos posted on Instagram. Even if you come away thinking you know what this show is about, you won’t know until you experience it. It’s so special that I’m only going to share bits and pieces.

Even if I wanted to, I don’t have more photos to share. I couldn’t be bothered to take more than 3 pictures. It was all I could do not to spill my wine, I was so mesmerized. Here’s what I can tell you:

  • From the moment the audience entered the amphitheater, they were part of the experience, before the “show” began.  This provided the opportunity to transition out of the day, beyond traffic, parking, the world at large, and into “the night” (as interpreted by David Byrne and St. Vincent).
  • The songs danced in harmony with the voices in my head. We’re not alone in this world, especially when you consider the beautiful absurdity of it all.
  • Outside of The Polyphonic Spree, I’ve not seen Annie Clark (“St. Vincent”) perform prior to this and I don’t know why the fuck not. It’s possibly the biggest mistake I’ve made.  She’s phenomenal.
  • The one woman in the audience who was encouraging people to sit down was sorely outnumbered. She eventually stood up.
  • This is a show that’s worth paying more for, in order to have seats closer to the stage. You can always watch the video monitors, but you’re going to want to see their feet.
  • Byrne and Clark don’t appear to perform music.  Music appears to perform them.  You can see every note winding its way through each of them.  The music takes form inside of them, before it’s articulated into sound externally.
  • There are certain tones in music that hit corresponding points in the body. You can feel the notes move through you and understand how they move through Byrne and Clark. It’s a two-way conversation, this David Byrne/St. Vincent show.
  • If you’ve been listening to their album, Love This Giant, this show’s arrangement will be an additional treat for you.
  • Here are the remaining tour dates and I’m told more will be announced, go: http://www.ilovestvincent.com/index.php/shows

 

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Metric at The Greek Theatre

Metric

Metric at The Greek Theatre

The guy behind me was jumping up and down before the show began. “I can’t help it! I’m just so excited!” he exclaimed. I looked at him, smiled, and screamed, “I’m excited too!”

Metric shows are always a lot of fun. The mere thought of their high energy performance is enough to fuel fans before the show begins and carry them all the way through to the next show. Their performance at The Greek Theatre in Los Angeles Tuesday night was no exception.

Shouts of “I love you Emily!” roared through the night sky between every song, the audience expressing their appreciation of the dynamic and captivating lead singer, Emily Haines. Typically the passionate cheers occurred as Haines was setting up for the next song. Without stopping, without breaking concentration, it was apparent Haines felt Emily Hainesthe love. A smile would start to appear on Haines’ face and then she and the band would launch into yet another crowd favorite – the musical equivalent of “I love you too”.

Rather than make the audience wait, wonder, and hope they’ll play it, Metric played “Help I’m Alive” fairly early in the set. It was a kind of gift, as if to say, “Now you can relax and enjoy the remainder of the show, without wondering if or when we’ll play that song.” Playing the encore-worthy hit early in their set was also quite a testament to Metric. The songs that preceded “Help I’m Alive” and the songs that followed punctuated the fact that Metric is no one-hit-wonder. Every song in their set is equally strong and infectious.

Metric’s concert at the 5,900-capacity Greek Theatre signifies quite a journey from the nights they used to play Club Spaceland (capacity: 260). During one of several moments in which she expressed gratitude to all in attendance, Haines reflected on those early days in Los Angeles. “As I sing these songs it brings me back to that time. I remember eating expired Power Bars from the 99 Cent store,” she said with laughter.

Metric

“I guess – when you look back on your life story – you want your life to be a collection of really great jokes” – Emily Haines

As I listened to Haines speak and reflected on their lyrics, I realized what I like most about Metric is that they celebrate all aspects of life, even the things others would classify as “fucked up”. It’s what makes us who we are – the good things and the challenges. The celebration is that we’re here to experience it all, together.

“I guess – when you look back on your life story – you want your life to be a collection of really great jokes. ” Haines continued.

As Metric played “Clone”, the crowd sang along, making the song their own personal anthem. “Nothing I’ve ever done right happened on the safe side. . .” the voices of the audience joined Haines proudly.  Then, in celebration of it all, “My regret only makes me stronger yet!”

MetricListening to Metric, experiencing their live shows, embarking on the journey from clubs to amphitheaters with them, it’s easy to understand why the audience adopts their songs as personal anthems.  Truth and acceptance. The truth is ok. Embrace it. Accept and celebrate who you are.

The light display along the back of  the stage transformed into a countdown clock prior to the encore. Again, a kind of gift, alerting the crowd that the band would of course return, no need to worry.  Rather than expend a lot of energy, creating thunderous applause and ear-piercing cheers to woo the band back to the stage, the audience gained energy in anticipation of the band’s return. As the moment neared, the audience roared, “Ten. . . nine. . . eight. . . seven. . . six. . . five. . . four. . . three. . . two. . . one!” and Metric took the stage again.

“It’s rock and roll, for fuck sake. I’m glad we survived. I’m glad you’re here with us. This is something we built together, at this point,” Haines said, once again thanking, and metaphorically sharing the stage with, the audience. The passionate anthem sing-a-longs continued until Metric left the stage and the house lights came on.

In addition to being a great band, Metric is an example of hard work and perseverance  paying off. Even as they celebrate their successes now, they continue to work hard. I saw them play, back in the day, at Spaceland – Metric has been giving it everything they’ve got, every step of the way.

Catch them on tour if you’re able: http://ilovemetric.com/tour/

Metric

 

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